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Knoxville Metro Area

How should Oak Ridge deal with homelessness?

Homeless man in Memphis

Homeless man in Memphis

Homelessness is the topic of the Lunch with the League (sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Oak Ridge) on Tuesday, March 5. As I wrote two years ago, there are homeless people here — and by now social service agencies know more about who they are and where they are than they did in 2011. In late January, the 24-hour “Point-in-Time Count” for Anderson County counted 72 people in the county who were “literally” homeless (both “unsheltered” homeless, who might be sleeping outdoors, in cars, in vacant buildings, or in all-night businesses, and “sheltered” homeless who were staying in shelters or supportive housing) and another 68 who were “precariously housed” (otherwise known as “couch homeless”). The homeless count has increased from year to year, probably because local agencies now have a better idea where and how to find the homeless here. I volunteered for this year’s count (because I wanted to learn more about the situation of this population and because I wanted to help) and participated in the midnight to 3 am shift, which looked for unsheltered homeless.

The lack of emergency shelters for the general homeless population in this county reduces the number of homeless here (local people lacking shelter are likely to end up in Knoxville shelters), but the numbers from this annual survey indicate unmet needs. The fact that their needs aren’t being met doesn’t mean they aren’t costing us money — a University of Tennessee study that found that in East Tennessee a chronically homeless person (the survey classified 56 of the Anderson County homeless as “chronically homeless”, based on a federal government definition of that term) costs the rest of us an average of $37,000 annually in costs for drug and alcohol treatment, jail time, emergency room care, and other services.

Mike Dunthorn is Tuesday’s luncheon speaker. His topic is “Solutions to prevent, reduce and end homelessness”. Dunthorn is an Oak Ridge native and ORHS graduate who is Program Manager for homeless service in the City of Knoxville’s Community Development Department, where he has worked since 1999. He was a co-author of the Knoxville-Knox County Ten Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness and is now working on developing a new revised plan. His presentation will focus on the issues confronting the City of Knoxville and efforts being made to address issues of homelessness by providing permanent solutions. He will address the value of partnering with many other organizations in providing assistance to the homeless, and will discuss how Oak Ridge and Anderson County may be able to benefit from some of the lessons learned in Knoxville. I look forward to hearing his perspectives on this topic.

Note: Lunch with the League is a free public event. It starts at noon in the Social Room at the Oak Ridge Unitarian Universalist Church, on the corner of Robertsville Road and Oak Ridge Turnpike.

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How East Tennessee stacks up against the world

Earlier this month, I attended the very interesting “East Tennessee Competes” conference sponsored by Plan ET. The moderator from the Southern Growth Policies Board, plus local economic development recruiters, local business leaders, and various community leaders provided perspectives on how the Knoxville metro area (including Oak Ridge) stacks up against the rest of the world in respect to things that matter to businesses considering new locations.
My notes say that site selection considers four key factors: Safety. Education.  Health.  Housing.
Health isn’t just health care. It’s also quality of life. In fact, healthy lifestyle is more important than access to care. Get people outdoors. Greenways, walking paths, etc. Our region stacks up very well in this area, but we need to promote it better in the economic development arena.  Also, we need to use it more. The crowd was asked to grade our region on healthy lifestyle, and gave our region’s citizens Cs and Ds for healthy lifestyle.
Education pays. There’s a $1.2 million lifetime salary  premium for a postsecondary degree. Our region has educational bright spots, but overall education is a weakness in the area. To prepare students for the workforce, Pellissippi State Community College is pushing career tech at that precollege level, as well as at PSCC..
Business community needs to identify the skills they need. That’s happening here. PSCC has put the 110 needs of auto industry into an online testing tool.
Businesses want quantifiable credentials.Good teachers are critical. Data are needed to know where each kid is and what they need.People all over the south are looking at Tennessee to see our innovation in K-12 education. Tennessee is truly a leader.
That leadership includes adoption of common core standards.The housing boom resulted in growth patterns everywhere that weren’t good for residents or government services: low density, narrow streets, etc. There should be a mix of housing options and socioeconomic status within neighborhoods.Someone asked about how business prospects react to homelessness. The surprising was that some businesses ask about how a community addresses its homeless population, because it’s a metric of how the community addresses its needs and problems. Cities and metro areas that do a good job addressing homelessness are also good places for corporate America to do business – who knew? Permanent supportive housing for homeless makes economic sense.Quality of life is critical for business . Business wants to be in sustainable communities.
This region is no longer competing across county lines. (Is that really true?)

Sites for large developments are a big challenge in this area, due to topography. Air quality is a challenge in recruitment.
Lifestyle initiatives here can be a big differentiator in recruitment. Urban wilderness project is big for Innovation Valley. (I wonder if Innovation Valley is sufficiently informed about Oak Ridge’s outdoor assets: Haw Ridge, North Boundary Trail, North Ridge Trail, rowing course, extensive greenbelts, Black Oak Ridge Conservation Easement, etc.)

Change is coming in air travel. To increase their cost efficiency, airlines are giving up the 50 -seat planes and will be using more big planes (again). McGhee Tyson Airport probably will lose some flight frequency (that is, we won’t have as many flights), but will have the same number of airplane seats. Some other cities will lose service altogether because they can’t support big planes.

Someone said that airfares are a “killer” for our region in business recruitment. Knoxville is mostly a business airport, which means higher air fares. There’s not much leisure travel here. We need lower fares (to increase leisure travel and attract business prospects).

Asthma incidence is a challenge. Air quality is better, but asthma is up.

First question about trails is always about safety. More crime in the mall than on trails.

Parks are one of the most democratic things we do.

Airport is a pretty diverse place. Suggestion to document traveler diversity on the website.

Transit, access to greenways,  etc., are being asked about more by business prospects that Innovation Valley talks to. Van pools. Zip car.

Carole Evans said this region should market itself as “one big playground”. Pursue low hanging fruit in energy savings.

Energy is a regional strength for Innovation Valley recruitment. The prospects of small modular reactors, carbon fiber, and advanced materials are a positive. Innovation valley needs to hear from people.

Knoxville has been identified as one of three US metros to have recovered to pre-2008 employment status.

Business sees low educational attainment and inequity within the region as disadvantages. Alcoa (the company) thinks the region needs more diversity. The Alcoa rolling mill is cost-competitive, but energy costs here weren’t globally competitive for smelter.

The region needs more skilled workforce, such as electricians. Not enough young people are coming up to replace the skilled workers who are retiring. Skilled workforce is an issue for Denso.

Wampler is marketing globally. It costs less for Denso to produce product here than in Japan. Alcoa thinks globally. Cheap natural gas is now an advantage for the US.

ORNL’s impact on the region include its being major employer. Subcontracting is also a direct impact. R&D is a source of impact. ORNL has affected the industry mix in the whole region. ORNL is now working systematically to improve regional education.

Murray says education is economic development. Need people with communication skills in addition to tech skills. Still not seeing enough girls in STEM. Wampler is much more automated; this changes the workforce need.

Alcoa says companies need to emphasize sustainability. Reduce footprint. Wampler is pursuing sustainable energy.

Is “Innovation Valley” a valid brand? Alcoa says yes; energy is critical to their business and it’s happening here. ORNL’s Thom Mason says we have technology, but not they way some people think of technology these days because it’s not social media and it’s not much biotech. Our tech assets include high performance computing.

Panelists were asked “Do elected officials get it?” Wampler got government help for its solar project. Alcoa had good cooperation when the smelter was going to shut down.

Anecdotes from the panelists: When Anton of the Alcoa company moved into a global job for the corporation, he could choose between this area and several other cities, and he stayed here because his wife prefers Tennessee. You can find the best here, but it’s a mixed bag…. not all of it’s good.

The region is not doing as well as we should on education of workforce. Do well on quality of life. Region has good business infrastructure, including rail and barge.

Wampler’s father used to say he’d rather die by hanging in east Tennessee than die a natural death anywhere else.

Need education and diversity.
Thom Mason: a lot can be done in education outside of public schools.

We’re a whole lot better off than a lot of southern cities.

Need to think and plan long-term.

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Not only in Knoxville

Plan ET region

Plan ET region

Yesterday’s Knoxville News Sentinel reported on plans for installation of electric-vehicle charging stations at public sites (parks and parking garages) in the city of Knoxville. This is not only happening in Knoxville — we’re getting ten federally funded charging stations at public places here in Oak Ridge, too. Five sites will each get two car-charging units. If I remember the list correctly, we can look for them soon at the Library-Civic Center complex, the Haw Ridge trailhead, the Children’s Museum of Oak Ridge, and the east- and west-end fire stations on Oak Ridge Turnpike. This will help define various Oak Ridge sites — especially Haw Ridge and the Children’s Museum — as good destinations for electric-car owners throughout the Knoxville metro area.

While it’s natural for Oak Ridgers like me to focus on our city and for the Knoxville paper to focus on its own backyard, I believe that we shouldn’t be thinking of our two cities in isolation. We are part of one metropolitan region that is increasingly interconnected — and our fortunes will rise or fall together. The economic development group Knoxville Oak Ridge Innovation Valley has produced an impressive list of rankings that indicate our strength as a region — number 1 in Green Jobs Growth according to the Brookings Institution, the number 4 High Tech Hub according to Business Facilities, number 5 for “Best Metro Value” according to Kiplinger’s, a number 8 ranking on CNN Money‘s “Fastest Growing Cities” list, and number 6 on the Forbes list of Best Metros for Jobs. Even though these rankings are sometimes described in regional media as relating to the “city of Knoxville”, these scores are based on statistics for the entire metropolitan area (usually the metropolitan statistical area of Knox, Anderson, Blount, Loudon, and Union counties), and Oak Ridge is a big part of the region’s successes.

This perspective has a lot to do with why I’m supportive of the Plan ET initiative. Although it is inevitable that we will continue to think about places like Knoxville, Farragut, Clinton, and Maryville as competitors, we need to think regionally and start to cooperate for our mutual benefit. This coming week I’ll be attending Plan ET working group meetings to discuss trends in the region, a draft vision for the region in the year 2040, and the next steps that will create some alternative scenarios for our future.

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Good press for our metro area

Forbes magazine ranks the Knoxville Metropolitan Area (which includes Oak Ridge) #6 in its list of the best “mid-size” metro areas for jobs (and we’re number 33 overall among the 398 U.S. metro areas), with healthy job growth. Interestingly, Knoxville seems to be bucking the trends described in the Forbes article, which says that that job growth is best in cities that are centers for the oil and gas industry (not us) and that college towns (Knoxville is one) and places with a large government presence (another attribute of this area) are doing less well than last year. The Innovation Valley website has a nice analysis of the positive business news in our region, including the diversity of the economic activity that led to this ranking.

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