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regional planning

Not only in Knoxville

Plan ET region

Plan ET region

Yesterday’s Knoxville News Sentinel reported on plans for installation of electric-vehicle charging stations at public sites (parks and parking garages) in the city of Knoxville. This is not only happening in Knoxville — we’re getting ten federally funded charging stations at public places here in Oak Ridge, too. Five sites will each get two car-charging units. If I remember the list correctly, we can look for them soon at the Library-Civic Center complex, the Haw Ridge trailhead, the Children’s Museum of Oak Ridge, and the east- and west-end fire stations on Oak Ridge Turnpike. This will help define various Oak Ridge sites — especially Haw Ridge and the Children’s Museum — as good destinations for electric-car owners throughout the Knoxville metro area.

While it’s natural for Oak Ridgers like me to focus on our city and for the Knoxville paper to focus on its own backyard, I believe that we shouldn’t be thinking of our two cities in isolation. We are part of one metropolitan region that is increasingly interconnected — and our fortunes will rise or fall together. The economic development group Knoxville Oak Ridge Innovation Valley has produced an impressive list of rankings that indicate our strength as a region — number 1 in Green Jobs Growth according to the Brookings Institution, the number 4 High Tech Hub according to Business Facilities, number 5 for “Best Metro Value” according to Kiplinger’s, a number 8 ranking on CNN Money‘s “Fastest Growing Cities” list, and number 6 on the Forbes list of Best Metros for Jobs. Even though these rankings are sometimes described in regional media as relating to the “city of Knoxville”, these scores are based on statistics for the entire metropolitan area (usually the metropolitan statistical area of Knox, Anderson, Blount, Loudon, and Union counties), and Oak Ridge is a big part of the region’s successes.

This perspective has a lot to do with why I’m supportive of the Plan ET initiative. Although it is inevitable that we will continue to think about places like Knoxville, Farragut, Clinton, and Maryville as competitors, we need to think regionally and start to cooperate for our mutual benefit. This coming week I’ll be attending Plan ET working group meetings to discuss trends in the region, a draft vision for the region in the year 2040, and the next steps that will create some alternative scenarios for our future.

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Busy evening

Tuesday evening shapes up as busy. First is a PlanET public forum, “What kind of East Tennessee do we want to pass on to our children?” or “Shared Values and Aspirations for 2040”, 5:30 PM at Anderson County High School. This is one of those events where people sit around a table and talk about their ideas, the comments get recorded, and finally all of the attendees vote on the top ideas. I find it interesting to listen to what people have to say. There’s some data on conditions in the 5-county region at http://www.planeasttn.org/, plus information on what people said at the first round of meetings — on the strengths and weaknesses of their communities and the region as a whole.

I expect to get to the forum for a little while, but I’ll need to bug out early for the City Council work session at 7 pm, back in Oak Ridge. I hope to see a lot of folks at Anderson County High School.

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